How We Discovered Gluten was the Problem

After I had completed the chemo, I wasn’t regaining energy and weight. I was experiencing constant fatigue, various forms of digestive distress, frequent migraines, etc. It wasn’t getting better. Doc J suggested I try an elimination diet to see if mt bodies reaction to the chemo was to change the way it handled food.

The Elimination Phase

The elimination phase involves removing foods you suspect trigger your symptoms for a short period of time, typically 2–3 weeks.

Eliminate foods that you think your body can’t tolerate, as well as foods that are notorious for causing uncomfortable symptoms.

Some of these foods include nuts, corn, soy, dairy, citrus fruits, nightshade vegetables, wheat, foods containing gluten, pork, eggs and seafood.

During this phase, you can determine if your symptoms are due to foods or something else. If your symptoms still remain after removing the foods for 2–3 weeks, it is best to notify your doctor.

Some foods you can eat include:

  • Fruits: Most fruits, excluding citrus fruits.
  • Vegetables: Most vegetables, excluding nightshades.
  • Grains: Including rice and buckwheat.
  • Meat and fish: Including turkey, lamb, wild game and cold-water fish like salmon.
  • Dairy substitutes: Including coconut milk and unsweetened rice milk.
  • Fats: Including cold-pressed olive oil, flaxseed oil and coconut oil.
  • Beverages: Water and herbal teas.
  • Spices, condiments and others: Including black pepper, fresh herbs and spices (excluding cayenne pepper and paprika) and apple cider vinegar.

Reintroduction Phase

The next phase is the reintroduction phase, in which you slowly bring eliminated foods back into your diet.

Each food group should be introduced individually, over 2–3 days, while looking for symptoms. Some symptoms to watch for include:

  • Rashes and skin changes
  • Joint pain
  • Headaches or migraines
  • Fatigue
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Changes in breathing
  • Bloating
  • Stomach pain or cramps
  • Changes in bowel habits

If you experience no symptoms during the period where you reintroduce a food group, you can assume that it is fine to eat and move on to the next food group.

However, if you experience negative symptoms like those mentioned above, then you have successfully identified a trigger food and should remove it from your diet.

The entire process, including elimination, takes roughly 5–6 weeks.

If you plan to eliminate many food groups, seek advice from your doctor or a dietitian. Eliminating too many food groups may cause a nutritional deficiency.

When gluten was eliminated, I started getting better. There were long term things that went away too – but took longer than a couple of weeks. Gluten is one of those heavily invasive items, but it can be done.

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